Cons: In our experience, capping your calories low will probably mean a lot of internal strife and stress. Plus, we’re big fans of enjoying food instead of fearing it, and 800 calories doesn’t leave much room for satisfied taste buds. Lastly, if you’re currently eating double to triple this amount of food, dropping to a daily caloric intake this low can tank your metabolism and actually slow weight loss more than switching to one of these other diets might. (Curious? Here’s why starving yourself won’t help you lose weight.)
Cleanses took many forms in 2018 — from the Izo Cleanse made popular by Kelly and Ryan to the "teatoxing" promoted by Cardi B, so it’s only logical that we’ll see more of 'em in 2019. And while none of these celebs are healthcare professionals, this breed of "cleanse" and "detox" mania fuels the fire of an already problematic diet culture. They propagate a myth that binging and restricting can make you happier and healthier, when in fact, it’s more accurately linked to obesity and depression — not to mention spending hard-earned money just to sit on the toilet.
Sure, there's your one friend who swears by the Taco Cleanse. And that other friend who ate nothing but broccoli soup for a month and dropped 20 pounds, found the love of her life, and got promoted at work. But before you start blending 80 stalks of broccoli into a cup or crunching your way through a crate of tacos, check out which diets are backed by science. Because don't you want to try one that will do the trick for you?
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